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Phillips/Powderhorn
Nokomis
Riverside
October 2013
 
  Nokomis  
   


(photo from the 12th Ward DFL endorsing convention: Andrew Johnson debating Sandy Colvin Roy) Twelfth Ward Candidate Forum at the Midtown Farmers' Market on Saturday, Oct.19, from 10 to 11 a.m. Audience members are invited to submit questions for the candidates during the forum. The event will be moderated by Rebekah Peterson, editor of My Broadsheet, and Judy Corrao, former 2nd Ward City Council member. In the event of inclement weather, the forum will move indoors to the nearby YWCA Midtown at 2121 E. Lake St.

 

Our choice for 11th and 12th Ward City Council members

For 12th Ward: Andrew Johnson, first choice; Chris Lautenschlager, second choice; Dick Franson, third choice

Andrew Johnson challenged incumbent DFL City Council Member Sandy Colvin Roy for the DFL endorsement last spring and came within a few votes of beating her. The critical issue that was her undoing was her vote to support the city subsidy for the new Vikings stadium. The initial $150 million for construction mushrooms to almost a billion dollar subsidy when you calculate interest on the bonds, contractual obligations for maintenance and police overtime in regulating traffic over the 30-year life of the contract. Initially Sandy said she would not support the proposal unless the voters approved it in a referendum—according to the provisions of the City Charter. But then she reversed herself and supported the proposal without asking the voters’ consent. Earlier, longtime critics of Sandy, like Charley Underwood (who ran against her four years ago), strongly supported her re-election. But when she reversed herself, they became her bitter opponents.

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For mayor:
Doug Mann, first choice
Jaymie Kelly, second choice Betsy Hodges, third choice


           
In a field of 35 candidates Doug Mann stands out as different. Most of the 35 candidates opposed the city subsidy of the Vikings stadium (which could easily reach a billion dollars over 30 years), but no one else took the issue to court and asked a judge to rule on whether the city must allow the voters to decide whether they want to pay that kind of money to a New Jersey billionaire.  The City Charter has been amended twice to insist that the people get the right to vote on whether to fund $10 or $15 million of city money for a football stadium.  Doug Mann argued on behalf of city voters before a judge on Aug. 20, and the judge has not yet issued his opinion.  People who support Doug believe no news is good news.  If the judge was going to deny the motion on a technicality, he could have done that almost immediately. 

read more

 

 

Analysis of the new City Charter proposal

On the ballot this November, along with the election of city officers, will be a proposal calling for the approval of a new city charter.  The City Charter Commission, a group of 15 people appointed by the District Court, has assured us that this new charter is the same as the old charter, just cleaned up and modernized.

On the website of the commission is the new charter, and a couple of side by side comparisons between the old charter and new charter.  Even with this documentation, it took me several very long days to go through the documents, and I am certain that I missed things.  I am not a lawyer, but I have spent most of my life with lawyers and one thing I am certain of, language matters.   Legalese is much maligned, for good reason, but lawyers use it to be specific in their meaning.

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Plans presented for the Minnehaha Falls Pavilion Renovation

ADAPTED FROM AN ARTICLE BY REBEKAH PETERSON, MY BROADSHEET, THAT APPEARED IN THE DAILY PLANET, SEPT. 26, 2013

Architect Paul May from Millier Dunwiddie explains the two renovation plans for the Minnehaha Falls Refectory at a recent open house.

In September, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board unveiled two options for the renovations planned for the Minnehaha Falls Refectory (pavilion).

The plans are based on feedback from the first open house and include a basic plan and an enhanced plan. At this point, the park board is looking to the community for input on the two plans—which plan is preferred, and which elements are most important.

Basic Plan Highlights:

•The bathrooms will received an upgrade with new fixtures, better lighting and ventilation.

•The kitchen area for Sea Salt will be expanded and the basement will include additional kitchen prep space for the restaurant.

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The hungry insurgent

I write a lot about our fragile food system.  It is fragile because much of our food comes from great distances, dependent on transportation infrastructure and lots of cheap fuel.  It is fragile because the synthetic fertilizers and pesticides that we put on our crops are hard on the land and ultimately destroy it, making it incapable of growing food.  It is fragile because weather has always made farming fragile, and we have messed up our weather patterns with human-created climate change, so crop-destroying weather events are becoming more common.  It is fragile because it depends on a fragile economic system that puts food production under a factory model that is subject to wild economic swings.

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Burning Waste No! Zero Waste Yes!



Paul Connett, Ph.D., professor emeritus of chemistry and environmental toxicology, and an international activist against incineration, spoke against the proposed capacity increase of the HERC garbage incinerator to an enthusiastic crowd on Sept. 17 at Mayflower Church in South Minneapolis.

“I didn’t intend to be fighting incinerators for the past 28 years, but, as John Lennon said, ‘Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.’ ”
“We are living on this planet like we have another one to go to!”

According to Connett, “We would need four or five planets if everyone consumed as much as the average American ... Meanwhile countries like India and China are copying our consumption patterns. And they are also building incinerators. China right now is building the largest incinerator in Asia in Beijing and planning 300 more ... Something needs to change. And it needs to start with how we handle waste.”

“Landfilling and incinerating unwanted refuse is a way to hide the evidence of over consumption,” he said. “Zero Waste is a stepping stone to sustainability.”

"Zero Waste is a
stepping stone to
sustainability."

 

read more

 

 

The new Jim Crow

PART 1

I consider Michelle Alexander’s book THE most important book dealing with race relations that’s been published since Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” in 1865. According to many, it helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War and the end of slavery. Several movies based on the book were made, and I can remember a silent version with Uncle Tom and Little Eva on an ice floe. I am convinced that if enough white people read Alexander’s book it could make a severe dent in racism. Professor of law and civil rights advocate Alexander has written a stunning book with statistics verifying almost every statement.

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The RCV/ballot access dilemma

This November 5th we’ll elect a new Minneapolis mayor, along with other ballot items.  But it’s in the context of the mayor’s race that we’ll try to make sense of the prospect of 35 candidates, three ranked choices and huge disagreement about the fairness and efficacy of this whole process. In the public debate, opinions range from “there should be even more candidates!” to dismay, from praise for the bold direction our city is taking to embarassment and to attempts (the League of Women Voters being a case in point) to artificially limit the scenario to something “normal.”

(The LWV has chosen to use campaign contributions as a test of who’s worthy of a seat at the debating table. Um, no.) The corporate media vacillates between treating its list of marginal candidates as wacky entertainment and ignoring them entirely to ponder the relative merits of its ever-changing list of “serious” ones.

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Ranked Choice Voting and the “Regime” that’s eating Minneapolis

Ranked Choice Voting … studying candidates’ positions … exhausted ballots … overvotes … undervotes … strategic votes … giant, voter-grinding calculating machines ...

Here’s to youuu … Mrs. Robinsonnnn … and blah blah blah.
Let me ask you a question, dear reader. If a “serious” mayoral candidate wins—would it make any difference in YOUR life?

For most people the answer is: “of course not.”

This is WHY most people DON’T VOTE in municipal elections. It’s not apathy … it’s rational behavior.

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42nd Street and 28th Avenue: Moving into the real world

The business district at 42nd and 28th has always seemed to Roosevelt High School students as the launchpad into the real world. They leave the protective bubble of high school and enter a world where people do meaningful things and actually get paid money for doing them. Trying to figure out that great mystery was answering the riddle of the universe: What do I do with my life? Who am I? What could I possibly do that people would pay me money to keep doing it?

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Changing our food system, one (Food) day at a time

The third annual Food Day takes place Oct. 24, 2013. Food Day is a movement that brings to public awareness the most pressing food issues that affect our country. It was created by the Center for Science in the Public Interest and is now organized by a large number of partners throughout the country. The organization describes its purpose with these words: “With Food Day, we can celebrate our food system when it works and fix it when it’s broken.”

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Kellogg Briand Pact was a good start

In John Lennon’s “Imagine,” he says that religion, nationality, greed or hunger shouldn’t divide us. He asks us to imagine what it would be like if we could all live as one, with nothing to kill or die for. That song was performed at a peace celebration held Aug. 27 at former Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg’s mansion in St. Paul. The words are a poetic version of the Kellogg-Briand Pact. The week before, on Aug. 21, the St. Paul City Council had voted to make Aug. 27 the “Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact Day,” commemorating the 85th anniversary of the law that outlawed war as an instrument of national policy and is still recognized by 84 countries, including the United States.

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Speaking of gardens, have you been to ‘God’s Garden’?

Alonzo Williams tends to God’s Garden

Minnesotans have three “go to” conversation starters:  the weather, road construction and gardens.  Let’s talk about gardens.  In the city you’ll find Community Sustainable Agriculture farms, which sell to subscribers; you’ll find thriving community gardens with their individual plots established on vacant city lots; you’ll find private gardens in back yards, alleys and front yards; and you’ll find various sites for the Youth Farm and Market Project, which sells its produce at different open-air markets.

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October

 

Nokomis Community Calendar

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Public Art to Be Installed at Powderhorn Park
The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) is working with a group of Minneapolis artists who have created a series of bronze plaques with the help of several area youths. The project is approved by the MPRB and fully funded by the artists and by a grant from the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. The artists, Gita Ghei, Sara Hanson, Jessica Tank and Elana Dahlberg, organized groups of Minneapolis kids and came up with 34 bronze plaques depicting water and nature conservation. The plaques will by securely installed into the new concrete path around Powderhorn Lake.

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Nokomis Religious Calendar

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Peace House Open House
On Oct. 17, 1985, Sr. Rose Tillemans, CSJ, writer and visionary, opened the doors of Peace House at 510 E. Franklin Ave., the place she had dreamed about, a space where people could gather for sharing and prayer. Until her early death in July of 2002, she guided volunteers to form a small community that provided safety, stability, respect and affirmation to those facing the struggles of poverty, violence, isolation, alcoholism and mental illness. Now, nearly 12 years later, Peace House lives on. Its new building at 1816 Portland Ave. S. will be dedicated Thursday, Oct. 17, with an open house from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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Phillips Powderhorn

 

City Council: Ninth Ward
First choice, Ty Moore; Second choice, Alondra Cano; Third choice, Pat Fleetham

For mayor:
Doug Mann, first choice
Jaymie Kelly, second choice Betsy Hodges, third choice

Analysis of the new City Charter proposal

Birds and humans migrate in September

My Father, Ken Tilsen

Remembrance

The RCV/ballot access dilemma

The hungry insurgent

Saving the Sears building

Changing our food system, one (Food) day at a time

Kellogg Briand Pact was a good start

 

 
Riverside


Thinkin’ about Shorty

Ellison on Syria

Transition Longfellow holds free movie night

My Father, Ken Tilsen

Remembrance

Incineration vs Recycling: A public health issue

Epiphanies

The Hungry Insurgent

Remembering Selby and Rondo Avenues

How to take advantage of your food

Soup for You! brings church and community together


 


Occupy Babylon

Occupy Babylon
       by Ed Felien

 

"God and the FBI"
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They Took Our
Home Away Today